Sunday, January 27, 2019

Dental Bridges


A Cost-Effective Option for Several Missing Teeth
For some patients with more than one missing tooth, a bridge may be a reasonable solution. Custom made with high-quality materials, a bridge is attached on both sides with crowns and fills up the gap for a return to comfortable tooth function, as well as a full smile.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Quick Nutrition Tips

Nutrition Tips
Following a proper and nutritious diet not only helps keep your body healthy, but your mouth as well. Nutrition plays an important role in the health and cleanliness of your teeth, gums and mouth.

Limit Soda, Coffee and Alcohol
Although these beverages contain a high level of phosphorous, which is a necessary mineral for a healthy mouth, too much phosphorous can deplete the body's level of calcium. This causes dental hygiene problems such as tooth decay and gum disease. Beverages containing additives such as corn syrup and food dye can make pearly white teeth appear dull and discolored. Therefore, it is best to choose beverages like milk, which helps strengthen teeth and build stronger enamel, giving you a healthy, beautiful smile.

Drink Tap Water When Possible
If bottled water is your main source of drinking water, you could be missing the decay-preventive benefits of fluoride.

Monitor Your Low-Carb Lifestyle
Despite their popularity, low-carb diets can cause bad breath. A balanced, dental-healthy diet can help reduce tooth decay.

Increase Your Calcium Intake
After age 20, both men and women lose more bone mass than they form so it is important to restore lost calcium with a daily supplement and by eating fruits and vegetables high in calcium, such as dark leafy greens. These foods will also help to lower the acid buildup in the saliva that can lead to breakdown of tooth enamel.

Take a Daily Dose of Vitamins C and D
These vitamins help support the absorption of healthy mouth minerals such as calcium and phosphorous, which support the bone and gum tissue, keeping it healthy. This is an easy way to maintain dental hygiene and fight gum disease.

Put Out the Cigarette
Smoking cigarettes is one of the greatest contributors to the aging mouth. According to the Center for Disease Control, more than 22 million women in the United States smoke cigarettes. In addition to staining teeth, smoking interrupts calcium absorption in the body and can also cause potentially life-threatening diseases such as oral cancer. So stop smoking and enjoy the health benefits as well as a healthy, beautiful smile.

The above article is from: OralB.com

417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Dental Tool Sterilization

State-of-the-Art Instrument Sterilization
Sterilization is taken very seriously in our dental practice. In addition to cleaning and sterilizing all instruments after each procedure, single-use tools are also employed as necessary. Instrument sterilization is achieved with a special machine called an autoclave, which is regularly monitored by an outside lab to ensure a high level of safety and sanitation. Your oral health is way too important for us to take even the slightest chances.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Dry Mouth at Night: The Causes and Management Tips

Below is an article written by by Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS and found on Colgate.com 

Have you ever woken up from a sound sleep with a dry mouth at night? Dry mouth, or xerostomia, can be caused by something as simple as sleeping with your mouth open or as complex as a side effect of medication. Read on to find out what may be at the root of your nighttime lip smacking.

Signs of Dry Mouth
Dry mouth can be as simple as the salivary glands not producing enough saliva to keep the mouth moist. Saliva is key to washing debris from your teeth and remineralizing tooth enamel. With too little of it, you may be at risk for tooth decay.

Aside from increasing your risk for cavities, dry mouth can be uncomfortable. If you are experiencing dry mouth at night, some noticeable morning signs are:

  • A sticky feeling in your mouth
  • Thick or stringy saliva
  • Bad breath
  • Dry or sore throat
  • Cracked or chapped lips
  • Mouth sores
  • Changed sense of taste

What Causes Xerostomia?
The occasional case of dry mouth at night may simply be due to dehydration, but age, medical conditions and habits can also contribute to its symptoms. The Mayo Clinic reports that several medications can cause dry mouth, such as muscle relaxants, depression and anxiety medications and antihistamines. It's also associated with diabetes and the autoimmune disorder Sjogren's syndrome. Cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy and radiation, can change or damage the salivary glands, as can nerve damage to the head and neck area.

Frequent tobacco and alcohol use can lead to xerostomia. Besides putting you at risk for oral cancer, smoking causes changes in saliva production. Alcoholic drinks and tobacco also irritate an already dry mouth and contribute to bad breath.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com

The remainder of the article details the following:


  • Ways to Manage Dry Mouth at Night

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Monday, January 14, 2019

Dental Grills: The Bad Things

Bad Effects Of Dental Grills
Dental grills, also known as “grillz,” have become popular among some teens and adults due to their popularity among celebrities, especially rap musicians. Grills are decorative covers that snap over one or more teeth. They are usually made of gold, silver or other precious metals. But less expensive grills are often made from base metals that can cause irritation or an allergic reaction.

There are no long-term studies of dental grills, so there are no data about long-term safety or about problems resulting from long-term wear.

Grills can promote plaque buildup and tooth decay because food particles and bacteria may build up between the teeth and the grill. A grill may also cause abrasion of the teeth that border it. Excessive wearing of grills may discolor teeth, too, so grill fans may need to whiten teeth when they decide to stop wearing the grill.

Anyone who wears a dental grill should be especially attentive to dental hygiene, and follow a consistent routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing. Also, be sure to remove the grill before eating and rinse it often to remove bacteria and food particles. Talk to your dentist before getting a dental grill and be sure to find out how best to reduce the risk of bacterial buildup and other complications.

The above article is from: OralB.com

417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Saliva Shortage? Pay Extra Attention to Plaque Removal

Saliva has an important job to do in your mouth. For starters, it helps to remove food particles. But it also helps prevent tooth decay and infection by washing away plaque and keeping disease-causing bacteria from building up on your teeth and gums. But saliva can’t do all that work by itself. So it’s important to remove plaque yourself by practicing good oral hygiene, which means proper flossing each day, and twice-daily tooth brushing.

Most of us don’t think about the moisture in our mouths until our mouths become dry. A variety of conditions can cause dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, including the following:

  • Cancer treatments. If you have any type of cancer of the head or neck and you receive radiation therapy, dry mouth is a common side effect because the radiation damages the salivary glands in addition to destroying the cancer. Some medications used to treat cancer in any part of the body can also cause dry mouth.
  • Prescription medications. Hundreds of common medications, including many antidepressants and medications for high blood pressure, can contribute to a dry mouth. If you take medications that seem to make your mouth feel dry, be especially vigilant about tooth brushing and proper flossing.
  • Nerve damage. Some types of injuries to the head or neck can damage the specific nerves that tell the salivary glands to produce saliva.
  • Chronic illness. Diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and Parkinson’s disease are among the diseases that can contribute to a chronic dry mouth.
  • Drug use. Methamphetamines have been associated with dry mouth.

To read the entire article please visit: OralB.com

417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Antimicrobial Therapy for Gum Disease

Below is an article written by by Tracey Sandilands and found on Colgate.com 

Antimicrobial therapy is a form of oral treatment used to eliminate or reduce the development of bacterial infections in the mouth. The therapy aims to prevent periodontal diseaseresulting from infections, which can cause painful, bleeding gums and loosening of your teeth.

Preparation and Treatment
If your dentist decides you will benefit from antimicrobial treatment, they will likely start with scaling and root planing. This process removes plaque and calculus (tartar) from the sulcus area around the teeth using either a scaler or instruments as well as an ultrasonic scaling device. In severe cases where there are periodontal pockets greater than 5-6 mm deep, the dentist may recommend that the patient be seen by a periodontist to evaluate the area with deeper pocketing and determine if gum surgery may be necessary. The scaling and root planing and gum surgery treatments require local anesthesia to reduce the patient's discomfort. The dental hygienist performs the scaling and root planing procedure.

During gum surgery, the periodontist makes an incision into the gum tissue, flaps the tissue back and cleans and scales the surface of the affected teeth and bone to remove the diseased tissue and infection. The gum tissue is then put back in place and sutured and the gum tissue will heal, and the periodontist will check the area a week or so after surgery. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash or antibiotic medication may be recommended for the next seven to 10 days.

Antiseptic Mouthwashes
Mouthwashes containing antiseptic ingredients help control the reproduction of the bacteria, which grow on the gum tissue in the mouth, and help to clean out the pockets around the individual teeth. The ingredients in antiseptic mouthwashes may include chlorhexidine, essential oils, and metal salts Sn11 and Zn11 to help control dental plaque and halitosis.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Antibiotic Medications
  • After Treatment

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Monday, January 7, 2019

Scaling And Root Planing: Professional Plaque Removal

Perhaps you’ve been neglecting a good oral health routine. Or, you’ve done your best, but you’ve developed plaque and tartar buildup. A regular routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing is an important part of regular plaque removal for everyone. But if you have risk factors that have caused a buildup of plaque on your teeth and gums to harden into tartar, your dentist or dental hygienist may suggest scaling or root planing your teeth to remove the buildup. If left untreated, severe tartar buildup along and under the gum line can cause the gums to pull away from the teeth, which may increase the risk of gum disease.

Scaling and root planing are common nonsurgical techniques that may prevent the need for more serious procedures, such as periodontal surgery or a root canal.

Here’s what to expect if your dentist or dental hygienist recommends these techniques:

  • You won’t feel it. You’ll receive a local anesthetic to numb the area.
  • Scaling: Your dentist or dental hygienist removes plaque and tartar from the areas both above and below the gum line.
  • Root Planing: Your dentist or dental hygienist uses special tools to smooth rough spots on the tooth roots. This process not only removes bacteria and helps reduce plaque buildup, but it provides a smooth surface for gums to reattach to the teeth.

After a scaling and root planing procedure, be sure to follow your dentist’s instructions and maintain an oral care routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing. If your gums are sensitive after the procedure, try a spongy floss, such as Oral-BÆ Ultra FlossÆ, to help prevent painful flossing.

The above article is from: OralB.com


417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  

Thursday, January 3, 2019

What Is the Best Age for Braces?

Below is an article written by by Steve Auger and found on Colgate.com 

Responsible parents always want what is best for their children, even if the kids don't see it that way. That means yearly physicals, regular dental checkups and an orthodontist appointment if you suspect your child needs braces. While you're preparing for the visit, brush up on the best age for braces.

What Do Braces Do?
Orthodontic treatment solves multiple mouth issues. Some of those issues include teeth crowding, missing or extra teeth, tooth spacing and improper bites. Orthodontic issues are referred to as malocclusions. Malocclusions that aren't fixed can cause problems down the line, including worn enamel, tooth decay and issues with chewing and speaking.

First Visit to the Orthodontist
The American Association of Orthodontists recommends scheduling a child's first orthodontist visit by age 7 or at the first visible sign of a malocclusion. At that age, the child's teeth and jaw are still developing, making orthodontic issues, such as tooth crowding, easier to address.
Your child might be a bit apprehensive about the visit. A good orthodontist will take measures to put your child at ease, like giving them an office tour and introducing them to the staff. Once your child is more relaxed, the orthodontist can conduct the initial exam to determine if treatment is needed. Photographs and X-rays of the mouth and teeth will be taken to help the orthodontist decide how to proceed.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Types of Misalignment
  • Adapting to Braces
  • Not Just for Children

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Wellness Dentistry

Understanding Wellness Dentistry

If, for example, you become ill, you go to your doctor for treatment. Let’s say that you make a full recovery. That’s great news! But what if you went to the doctor when you were feeling WELL and you learned how to not get sick in the first place? That would be even better because who really wants to get sick? That’s what we call “Wellness Care.” This approach to oral health is what drives our practice. Of course we can get your teeth and gums healthy and repair any damage like every other dental office. But we go beyond this and show you how to prevent dental problems before they develop. We begin with a thorough examination. We evaluate your bite and how your teeth mesh together. We also look for oral cancer, gum disease, signs of wear, and any potential problem that you might encounter in the future. We want to prevent problems and make your teeth and gums healthy, which leads to less time spent at the dental office!

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com