Sunday, February 17, 2019

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 3 of 3)

Improper Brushing Technique 











Here's one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

Using a Brush That's Not the Best Fit for You 











There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you're comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing. No matter which you choose remember that it's not all about the brush- a clean mouth is really up to the brusher!

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Sunday, February 10, 2019

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 2 of 3)

Brushing Right After Eating 











If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing-especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

Storing Your Brush Improperly 











When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles 











Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Sunday, February 3, 2019

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 1 of 3)

Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long 











The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean-these are signs it’s time to let go. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Not Brushing Long Enough 











Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short -the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer. Or distract yourself by humming your favorite tune!

Brushing Too Hard 











Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that loves to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Gum Disease Dental Heath

To Your Overall Good Health
There are numerous studies linking heart disease, strokes, and other medical conditions to the presence of gum disease. The research demonstrates that dental health goes beyond just a nice smile without toothaches. From having strong teeth to properly chew, to healthy gums, excellent dental health is an important factor to your overall wellness and vitality. In recognition of the importance of having a healthy smile, Dr. Kravitz has implemented a new process that goes well beyond the “diagnose and repair problems” approach with many in the dental profession. Using these methods, your dental health (and especially your gums) is tracked on graphs from visit to visit, and maintained in our computer system, where it allows us to display a visual history of your dental health. This allows Dr. Kravitz to set health goals with patients. Our practice works with you, similar to a coach or trainer, in achieving those goals.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Sunday, January 27, 2019

Dental Bridges


A Cost-Effective Option for Several Missing Teeth
For some patients with more than one missing tooth, a bridge may be a reasonable solution. Custom made with high-quality materials, a bridge is attached on both sides with crowns and fills up the gap for a return to comfortable tooth function, as well as a full smile.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Dental Tool Sterilization

State-of-the-Art Instrument Sterilization
Sterilization is taken very seriously in our dental practice. In addition to cleaning and sterilizing all instruments after each procedure, single-use tools are also employed as necessary. Instrument sterilization is achieved with a special machine called an autoclave, which is regularly monitored by an outside lab to ensure a high level of safety and sanitation. Your oral health is way too important for us to take even the slightest chances.

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Dry Mouth at Night: The Causes and Management Tips

Below is an article written by by Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS and found on Colgate.com 

Have you ever woken up from a sound sleep with a dry mouth at night? Dry mouth, or xerostomia, can be caused by something as simple as sleeping with your mouth open or as complex as a side effect of medication. Read on to find out what may be at the root of your nighttime lip smacking.

Signs of Dry Mouth
Dry mouth can be as simple as the salivary glands not producing enough saliva to keep the mouth moist. Saliva is key to washing debris from your teeth and remineralizing tooth enamel. With too little of it, you may be at risk for tooth decay.

Aside from increasing your risk for cavities, dry mouth can be uncomfortable. If you are experiencing dry mouth at night, some noticeable morning signs are:

  • A sticky feeling in your mouth
  • Thick or stringy saliva
  • Bad breath
  • Dry or sore throat
  • Cracked or chapped lips
  • Mouth sores
  • Changed sense of taste

What Causes Xerostomia?
The occasional case of dry mouth at night may simply be due to dehydration, but age, medical conditions and habits can also contribute to its symptoms. The Mayo Clinic reports that several medications can cause dry mouth, such as muscle relaxants, depression and anxiety medications and antihistamines. It's also associated with diabetes and the autoimmune disorder Sjogren's syndrome. Cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy and radiation, can change or damage the salivary glands, as can nerve damage to the head and neck area.

Frequent tobacco and alcohol use can lead to xerostomia. Besides putting you at risk for oral cancer, smoking causes changes in saliva production. Alcoholic drinks and tobacco also irritate an already dry mouth and contribute to bad breath.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com

The remainder of the article details the following:


  • Ways to Manage Dry Mouth at Night

Jeffrey B. Kravitz, DDS, DICOI    
417 Water Street   
Wakefield, MA 01880    
(781) 245-7714  
WakefieldFamilyDentist.com